Drawing the Clebsch Surface as Particles

clebsch

http://matthewarcus.github.io/polyjs/clebsch.html

https://github.com/matthewarcus/polyjs/blob/master/js/clebsch.js

Instead of using a triangulated mesh, we can display a surface in 3d by simply generating a set of random points on the surface and displaying them as a sort of particle system. Let’s do this with the famous Clebsch cubic surface: the points are stored as homogeneous coordinates, to display we multiply by a quaternion to rotate in projective space before doing the usual perspective projection to Euclidean space.

The Clebsch surface is the set of points (x0,x1,x2,x3,x4) (in projective 4-space) that satisfy the equations:

x0 + x1 + x2 + x3 + x4 = 0
x03 + x13 + x23 + x33 + x43 = 0

To simplify things, we can eliminate x0 (= x1 + x2 + x3 + x4) and rename a little, to get the single cubic equation:

(x + y + z + w)3 = x3 + y3 + z3 + w3     [***]

defining a surface in projective 3-space, with the familiar 4-element homogeneous coordinates.

Since coordinates are homogeneous, we can just consider the cases of w = 1 and w = 0 (plane at infinity), but for w = 0, it turns out the solutions are some of the 27 lines which we shall later draw separately, so for now just consider the case w = 1 for which we have:

(x + y + z + 1)3 = x3 + y3 + z3 + 1

and given values for x and y, we can solve for z easily – the cubes drop out and we just have a quadratic equation that can be solved in the usual way:

3Az2 + 3A2z + A3 - B = 0 where A = x+y+1, B = x3 + y3 + 1

We can now generate points on the surface by randomly choosing x and y and solving for z to give a set of homogeneous points (x,y,z,w) satisfying [***] and we can get further solutions by permuting the coordinates. We don’t need all permutations since some of the coordinates are arbitrary, and points that are multiples of each other are equivalent. The random points themselves are generated by this Javascript function, that generates points between -Infinity and +Infinity, but clustered around the origin.

function randpoint() {
        var x = 1/(2*Math.random()-1);
        if (x < 0) x -= 1;
        if (x > 0) x += 1;
        return x;
    }

The Clebsch surface of course is famous for its 27 lines, so we draw these in as well, also as random selection of points rather than a solid line. 15 lines are points of the form (a,-a,b,-b,0) and permutations – since we are working in 4-space, this becomes 12 lines of form (a,-a,b,0) and three of form (a,-a,b,-b). These 15 lines are drawn in white and can be seen to intersect in 10 Eckardt points where 3 lines meet (though it’s hard to find a projection where all 10 are simultaneously visible). The other 12 lines are of the form (a,b,-(φa+b),-(a+φb),1) where φ is the golden ratio, 1.618.. and can be seen to form Schläfli’s “Double Six” configuration – each magenta or cyan line intersects with exactly 5 other lines, all of the opposite color.

All that remains is to project into 3-space – as usual we divide by the w-coordinate, but to get different projections, before doing this we rotate in projective space by multiplying by a quaternion & then varying the quaternion varies the projection. (Quaternion (d,-a,-b,-c) puts plane (a,b,c,d) at infinity – or alternatively, rotates (a,b,c,d) to (0,0,0,1) – it is well known that quaternions can be used to represent rotations in 3-space, but they also work for 4-space (with 3-space as a special case) – a 4-space rotation is uniquely represented (up to sign) by x -> pxq where p and q are unit quaternions). Here we multiply each point by a single quaternion to give an isoclinic or Clifford rotation – every point is rotated by the same angle.

We are using Three.js, which doesn’t seem to accept 4d points in geometries – we could write our own vertex shader to do the rotation and projection on the GPU, but for now, we do it on the CPU; updating the point positions is reasonably fast with the Three.js BufferGeometry. Actually displaying the points is simple with the THREE.Points object – we use a simple disc texture to make things a little more interesting, and attempt to color the points according to the permutations used to generate them.

The mouse and arrow keys control the camera position, square brackets move through different display modes, space toggles the rotation.

An excellent reference giving details of the construction of the surface (and good French practise) is:

http://www.mathcurve.com/surfaces/clebsch/clebsch.shtml

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Drawing Uniform Polyhedra with Javascript, WebGL and Three.js

Screenshot from 2015-06-21 22:46:59

I’ve been meaning to write this up properly for a long time, but for now, this link will have to do:

http://matthewarcus.github.io/polyjs/

The idea is to use some fairly straightforward vector geometry to generate uniform polyhedra and their derivatives, using the kaleidoscopic construction to generate Schwarz triangles that tile the sphere. We use spherical trilinear coordinates within each Schwarz triangle to determine polyhedron vertices (with the trilinear coordinates being converted to barycentric for actually generating the points). Vertices for snub polyhedra are found by iterative approximation.

We also can use Schwarz triangles to apply other symmetry operations to the basic polyhedra to generate compound polyhedra, including all of the uniform compounds enumerated by John Skilling (as well as many others).

There are some other features including construction of dual figures, final stellations, inversions, subdividing polyhedra faces using a Sierpinksi construction, as well as various colouring effects, exploding faces etc..

Much use was made of the work of others, notably George Hart and Zvi Har’El as well as the wonderful Three.js library by Mr.doob.

Screenshot from 2015-06-22 19:21:43
Screenshot from 2015-06-22 19:27:19
Screenshot from 2015-06-21 22:52:41
Screenshot from 2015-06-21 23:02:21
Screenshot from 2015-06-21 23:11:30


Javascript Quines

A Quine is a program that when run, prints itself. For example, in Javascript we can write:

> (function $(){console.log('('+$+')()');})()
(function $(){console.log('('+$+')()');})()

This is nice, but we can see that it depends on the fact that in Javascript a function automatically converts to a string that is its own source code; also, it would be nice to get rid of the explicit function binding.

Using an idea from Lisp (and this is surely inspired by the (λx.xx)(λ.xx) of the lambda calculus), we can use an anonymous function:

> var f = function(s) { console.log("("+s+")"+"("+s+")");}
> f(f)
(function (s) { console.log("("+s+")"+"("+s+")");})(function (s) { console.log("("+s+")"+"("+s+")");})
> (function (s) { console.log("("+s+")"+"("+s+")");})(function (s) { console.log("("+s+")"+"("+s+")");})
(function (s) { console.log("("+s+")"+"("+s+")");})(function (s) { console.log("("+s+")"+"("+s+")");})

This works nicely, with no function binding needed (we are just using the definition of f to get going here), but we are still using implicit conversion from functions to strings. Let’s try explicitly quoting the second occurrence of s:

> var f = function(s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+"\""+s+"\""+")");}
> f(f)
(function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+"\""+s+"\""+")");})("function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+"\""+s+"\""+")");}")

That isn’t well-formed Javascript though, the single quotes in the stringified version of the function haven’t been escaped, so this won’t compile. We need to somehow insert the quotes into the string, but without getting into an endless regression with extra layer of quotes (this problem really only exists because opening and closing quotes are the same, if quoting nested in the same way that bracketing does, it would all be much easier).

(Note also that while we are using implicit function to string conversion to construct our Quine, the Quine itself doesn’t use that feature).

One simple solution is to insert the quotes as character codes:

> var f = function(s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+String.fromCharCode(39)+s+String.fromCharCode(39)+")");}
> f(f)
(function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+String.fromCharCode(39)+s+String.fromCharCode(39)+")");})('function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+String.fromCharCode(39)+s+String.fromCharCode(39)+")");}')
> (function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+String.fromCharCode(39)+s+String.fromCharCode(39)+")");})('function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+String.fromCharCode(39)+s+String.fromCharCode(39)+")");}')
(function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+String.fromCharCode(39)+s+String.fromCharCode(39)+")");})('function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+String.fromCharCode(39)+s+String.fromCharCode(39)+")");}')

but that seems rather inelegant and while EBCDIC computers are rare these days, it would be good to be character set independent.

We can also use a library function to handle quoting:

> f = function(s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+JSON.stringify(s)+")");}
> f(String(f))
(function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+JSON.stringify(s)+")");})("function (s){console.log(\"(\"+s+\")\"+\"(\"+JSON.stringify(s)+\")\");}")
> (function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+JSON.stringify(s)+")");})("function (s){console.log(\"(\"+s+\")\"+\"(\"+JSON.stringify(s)+\")\");}")
(function (s){console.log("("+s+")"+"("+JSON.stringify(s)+")");})("function (s){console.log(\"(\"+s+\")\"+\"(\"+JSON.stringify(s)+\")\");}")

but we might object to such a heavyweight solution.

Another way forward is suggested by this C Quine:

main(){char q='"';char*f="main(){char q='%c';char*f=%c%s%c;printf(f,q,q,f,q);}";printf(f,q,q,f,q);}

where we avoid quoting in the quoted body by passing in the required characters from outside.

Here’s something similar in Javascript:

> f = function(s,q,b,k){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+k);}
> f(f,"\"","(",")")
(function (s,q,b,k){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+k);})("function (s,q,b,k){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+k);}")

Now there is no quotation at all in the function body, but this doesn’t quite work as we need to pass in the character parameters in the main function call, and for this we need to pass in the comma and escape characters as well:

> f = function(s,q,b,k,c,e) { console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+k+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+k); }
> f(f,"\"","(",")",",","\\")
(function (s,q,b,k,c,e) { console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+k+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+k); })("function (s,q,b,k,c,e) { console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+k+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+k); }"),"\"","(",")")

Almost there; we are, again, just missing some parameters in the main call, but this time we can close the loop completely:

> f = function(s,q,b,k,c,e){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k);}
> f(f,'"',"(",")",",","\\");
(function (s,q,b,k,c,e){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k);})("function (s,q,b,k,c,e){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k);}","\"","(",")",",","\\")
> (function (s,q,b,k,c,e){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k);})("function (s,q,b,k,c,e){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k);}","\"","(",")",",","\\")
(function (s,q,b,k,c,e){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k);})("function (s,q,b,k,c,e){console.log(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k);}","\"","(",")",",","\\")

Not minimal in terms of length, but fairly minimal in terms of features required – no library functions, no fancy string formatting directives, no name binding apart from function application, no language specific tricks, no character set dependencies; we haven’t even made use of there being two ways to quote strings in Javascript.

Since we aren’t being very specific to Javascript, it’s easy to adapt the solution to other languages:

Haskell:

(\s q b k e->putStrLn(b++s++k++q++e++s++q++q++e++q++q++q++b++q++q++k++q++q++e++e++q))"\\s q b k e->putStrLn(b++s++k++q++e++s++q++q++e++q++q++q++b++q++q++k++q++q++e++e++q)""\"""("")""\\"

Python 3 (this doesn’t work in Python 2 as print can’t be used in lambda functions there):

(lambda s,q,b,k,c,e:print(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k))("lambda s,q,b,k,c,e:print(b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k)","\"","(",")",",","\\")

Again, there are shorter Quines in both languages, but the ones I have seen all require some extra feature, eg. escaping quotes using “show” in Haskell or “%r” in Python.

Finally, since Javascript has an eval function, we can construct a string that evaluates to itself:

> f = function(s,q,b,k,c,e){return b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k;}
> f(f,"\"","(",")",",","\\")
'(function (s,q,b,k,c,e){return b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k;})("function (s,q,b,k,c,e){return b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k;}","\\"","(",")",",","\\\\")'
> eval(_)
'(function (s,q,b,k,c,e){return b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k;})("function (s,q,b,k,c,e){return b+s+k+b+q+s+q+c+q+e+q+q+c+q+b+q+c+q+k+q+c+q+c+q+c+q+e+e+q+k;}","\\"","(",")",",","\\\\")'